Nooks and Crannies …

It is only when we silent the blaring sounds of our daily existence that we can finally hear the whispers of truth that life reveals to us, as it stands knocking on the doorsteps of our hearts. ~` K.T. Jong

lantern I wrote last month about my love affair with the out-of-the-way back corners of Ray’s Garden.  Well, it seems I am still finding little nooks and crannies – small, quiet places, tucked away — offering just a moment or two of grace in a normally busy phones-ringing, people-talking, radio-playing world. bunny This little guy is one of my favorite garden inhabitants.  He lives under a shrub, as befits a proper, quiet rabbit.  I believe he is meant to be depicted as eating something but, to me, he always looks as if he is holding his paws to his face saying, “Oh, my!”

Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul. ~~John Muir

2 cherubs It appears one of these cherubs has lost a wing – which is certainly sad, but they do seem to be entirely content to be earthbound in their little piece of garden.

It’s tucked away in a quiet corner, shadowed and obscured… It doesn’t advertise and it doesn’t care if you habitually pass by on the other side. It’s just there for when you need it. ~~ Simon R. Green, Agents of Light and Darkness

lantern 2 There are little patches of grace and beauty all around us — just waiting to be noticed.  I guess it is my job to open my eyes and actually see them … instead of simply rushing past with my eyes set on the screen of my cell phone.

Welcome, wild harbinger of spring! To this small nook of earth; Feeling and fancy fondly cling, Round thoughts which owe their birth, To thee, and to the humble spot, Where chance has fixed thy lowly lot. ~~ Bernard Barton

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Back Corners

Life is sometimes made of the small moments of contentment you find in the quiet corners of your day ~~ Anonymous

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This may well be my favorite corner of Ray’s Garden.  It’s that back corner that is really no part of the garden — it’s just a waiting place — never static, always changing …  I check it out every day that I am here and, as you can see, I’ve been photographing it for quite some time, in many different seasons.  It is a small, beautiful piece of art in and of itself.  And you never never know what will pop up here:  house plants coming out for a breath of air, a pot with nothing more than a stick in it – until, against all odds, the stick sprouts one leaf at its very top — and later yet becomes a fig tree.  Sometimes its an old teapot used as a planter and often, stray toys left by the grandchildren.

blue petunias

The most noteworthy thing about gardeners is that they are always optimistic, always enterprising, and never satisfied. They always look forward to doing something better than they have ever done before. ~~ Vita Sackville-West

abutilon

This is the corner where sick plants come to get better — or to finally die.  This is the “waiting room” where things go while a permanent bed is made ready for them.  This is that paradox:  a place of permanent transition …

peashootsyellow primrose

Still round the corner there may wait, A new road or a secret gate. ~~ J. R. R. Tolkien

basil and geraniums

I think what I love the most is the fact that this corner doesn’t expect anything, doesn’t ask anything — it simply accepts whatever comes its way each day and offers itself, whether it’s bright and colorful or mostly quietly green.  It just is — for awhile — and then it’s something else  …

In this world without quiet corners, there can be no easy escapes from history, from hullabaloo, from terrible, unquiet fuss. ~~ Salman Rushdie

all green

This one is a different corner — even less in public view — but another favorite …

pots

I love the hodge-podge of shapes and colors and the fact hat every piece is ready — waiting to play its role in the larger picture.  I can only wish my life were this organized!

I look out of this window and I think this is a cosmos, this is a huge creation, this is one small corner of it. The trees and birds and everything else and I’m part of it. I didn’t ask to be put here, I’ve been lucky in finding myself here. ~~ Morris West

Looking to the New

“The shortest day has passed, and whatever nastiness of weather we may look forward to in January and February, at least we notice that the days are getting longer.  Minute by minute they lengthen out.  It takes some weeks before we become aware of the change.  It is imperceptible even as the growth of a child, as you watch it day by day, until the moment comes when with a start of delighted surprise we realize that we can stay out of doors in a twilight lasting for another quarter of a precious hour.” ~~ Vita Sackville-West

It has been — it is still being the strangest of winters.  We had virtually no rain through all of December and January.  We had several weeks of freezing weather, which is most unusual around here — we get scattered nights with below 32 degree temperatures but they are few and far between..  We soft-living Californians were like hot-house plants suddenly thrown out into the cruel cold.  These freezing weeks were immediately followed by two or three weeks of such balmy warmth that we walked around in shorts and flip-flips. While that might be somewhat normal for southern California, this is northern California — no sandals here in January! On top of that we are now officially in a drought — yet it is raining outside today — glorious rain! — the first real rain we’ve had this long winter.  Last weekend we even had snow in the hills around us!  Again, a pretty unusual happening — something that comes maybe once every four or five years. ….. A very strange winter!

Here in Ray’s garden, almost nothing is blooming — the paper-white narcissus and the old-fashioned purple iris are the only winter faithfuls doing their job right now.  And so, clean-up and planning for future additions is about all that’s going on here, but goodness knows, that’s plenty.

cutting corners

Here they are “cutting a corner” — actually repaving a spot that a delivery truck destroyed one day.  While the location is often mistaken for a home, this is a business, and very large trucks come through making deliveries.  After the third or fourth time this corner was flattened, Ray wisely decided to cut it back and give the trucks more space.

The major remodel however is happening in that back area where things get dumped that you don’t want seen — every garden has a space like this.  This one has been cleared out and has some lovely new paving in place.

mud path

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“Bare branches of each tree
on this chilly January morn
look so cold so forlorn.
Gray skies dip ever so low
left from yesterday’s dusting of snow.
Yet in the heart of each tree
waiting for each who wait to see
new life as warm sun and breeze will blow,
like magic, unlock springs sap to flow,
buds, new leaves, then blooms will grow.”
~~ Nelda Hartmann, January Morn  

The grapefruit tree once stood where the paving now lies, and the persimmon and pear trees are just around the corner.  The grapefruit, which was always in an awkward spot, has been moved to a back corner and we are all anxiously watching to see if it will survive.  The existing trees are now to be joined by a Mission Fig, an Italian Prune, and a Fuji Apple.  (That’s the heavily-pruned grapefruit under cover in the back corner.)

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Now we wait.  These are the waiting weeks.  Clean-up has been done.  Pruning is finished for the moment.  The beds have been cleared of excess growth.  Everything is clean and bare — and now we wait for what this very strange weather-year will bring us.  And we dream of bright blossoms and fresh new fruit.

“I prefer winter and fall, when you feel the bone structure in the landscape – the loneliness of it – the dead feeling of winter.  Something waits beneath it – the whole story doesn’t show.” ~~  Andrew Wyeth  

Grow a Rainbow

Red and yellow and pink and green,  purple and orange and blue — I can sing a rainbow, sing a rainbow, sing a rainbow too. ~~ Arthur Hamilton

I don’t know about anyone else, but when the temperature outside is hanging out at over 100 degrees, I am inclined to leave the garden to get along on it’s own for awhile (except for watering, of course) while I stay inside at my computer.  So this week I am sorting and categorizing the photos I’ve been taking for the past few weeks – and I have been struck – as I think I am every year – by the sheer profusion of colors to be found in one small garden.

There’s golden yellow:

rubeckia

and a charming peachy-orange:

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and a profusion of purple:

purple2

The garden doesn’t really need a lot of words from me — it’s enough to just look …

There’s a heavenly blue:

blue

and pink “naked ladies”:

naked ladies

and more purple:

purple1

and a small but present dahlia in an eye-piercing yellow:

yellow dahlia

And that doesn’t even begin to include the dozens of colors represented in the various roses around the place.  Next week I’ll be featuring the vast profusion of greens to be found when you look past the vivid colors.

Gardening is how I relax. It’s another form of creating and playing with colors. ~~ Oscar de la Renta

Into Each Life Some Rain Must Fall …

I’m singing in the rain, just singing in the rain; What a wonderful feeling, I’m happy again.  ~~ Arthur Freed

Into each life some rain must fall (at least according to Longfellow) but around here that has been a VERY little rain, lately — but we did get a nice shower a few  days ago.  It washed the leaves and cleaned the air.

full one

rain

Rain has been a largely absent commodity this year.  We’ve just left behind one of the driest winters I remember in awhile.  I fear it is going to be blisteringly hot this summer — the seasonal creeks that usually have water in them at least until July are already almost dry. That’s why it was so nice to spend some time in the rain-sweet garden –just breathing in the clean,sweet air.

When it rains on your parade, look up rather than down. Without the rain, there would be no rainbow. ~~ Gilbert K. Chesterton

lilies in rain

Let the rain kiss you. Let the rain beat upon your head with silver liquid drops. Let the rain sing you a lullaby.   ~~ Langston Hughes

full two

This rose looked unearthly in the overcast light- an eerie beauty … and no, it’s not photo shopped.

rain rose

I don’t expect more rain for quite sometime, but — oh — it was a lovely gift while it lasted!

full three

A Rainbow of Iris

In Greek mythology, Iris is one of the messengers of the gods, though less well known for this attribute than her masculine counterpart Hermes/Mercury.  She is more commonly known as the goddess of the rainbow — all the beautiful colors of the rainbow.

Mauve w-poppies 2

Once again, we haven’t a lot to say about Ray’s Garden — just a collection of photos of the plants that have been bringing us joy lately.  Hope you enjoy them,too.

“Thou art the Iris, fair among the fairest,
Who, armed with golden rod
And winged with the celestial azure, bearest
The message of some God.”
–  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Iris

apricot

blue two-tone

two-tone

“Since Iris is the Greek goddess for the Messenger of Love, her sacred flower is considered the symbol of communication and messages.  Greek men would often plant an iris on the graves of their beloved women as a tribute to the goddess Iris, whose duty it was to take the souls of women to the Elysian fields.”  
–  Hana No Monogatari: The Stories of Flowers

blue

bronze

As usual, we have no names for each particular variety here — since most Iris home-growers trade for colors rather than name.  [Oh, I don’t have that shade of blue.  Maybe when you thin them out I could have one?  I have a particularly gorgeous bronze I’ll trade you…..]

When I first moved to Sonoma County years ago I met an older woman whose Iris garden was the talk of the town.  On hearing that I was just starting my garden in a new home she offered me a few rhizomes when she thinned out the next day.  “Just come on by and I’ll give you a few.”   I went home that next day with three large shipping boxes filled with Iris!  It took me a week working full time to get them all into the ground.

One more photo …  This little guy does not have a  particularly large or showy blossom– though it is a lovely color.  It is most interesting for its wonderfully striped leaves.

variegated

Everything’s Coming Up Roses!

“I believe in roses. Oh God, yes! I do believe in roses! And I believe in lots and lots and lots of them, too!”  ~~ C. JoyBell

Lord, it’s been ages since I posted here!  I thought Spring would be such a great time to garden-blog — and I’m still sure it is — but things got more than a little hectic around here recently, with a loss in Ray’s family, and new personnel in the business — and Spring sort of had to make it on it’s own out there.  I do have dozens of photos but no blog to go with them.

orange 2

Rather than try to play “catch up,” I’m just going to jump in with the biggest thing going right now — which is roses — roses everywhere!  Our Mediterranean climate here seems perfectly suited for roses, and they are everywhere you look.

rose hedge

single red

I’d rather have roses on my table than diamonds on my neck. ~~ Emma Goldman

I unfortunately do not have names for  most of these roses, but here’s the one I do know — the Fourth of July climber:

trellis

4th of july

I do love this rose!

“What’s in a name? that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”   ~~ William ShakespeareRomeo and Juliet

single white

yellow

pink

“It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important.”  ~~ Antoine de Saint-ExupéryThe Little Prince